Political expert declares The Voice to Parliament is ‘over’ after horror Newspoll for the Yes camp

Political expert declares The Voice to Parliament is ‘over’ after horror Newspoll for the Yes camp

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A political editor has declared the Indigenous Voice to Parliament ‘is over’ after a devastating Newspoll released on Monday found the No vote ahead 53 to 38.

‘They can’t win. It’s over,’ Sky News’ Andrew Clennell said of the Yes campaign on Monday afternoon. 

‘So now it becomes about the margin, and not embarrassing the Prime Minister. It’s dire straits. 

‘When do you see 38 to 53 turn around in six weeks?’ 

Sky News political editor Andrew Clennell declared that the Voice to Parliament 'is over'

Sky News political editor Andrew Clennell declared that the Voice to Parliament ‘is over’ 

An October 14 referendum will ask Australians if they wish to recognise Indigenous people in the constitution and enshrine a proposed advisory body called the Voice.

Consecutive polls have shown support for the Voice has been sliding. Success will require a majority of voters and a majority of states voting in favour.

Cabinet minister Tony Burke said he was confident the referendum would succeed.

‘(Opposition Leader) Peter Dutton, I think, has underestimated the goodwill of a whole lot of Liberal voters here as well,’ he told ABC radio on Monday.

‘There’s a generosity in the Australian people and as people come closer to the date, focus their minds, look at the proposal, we see something where there’s nothing to lose and everything to gain.’

Mr Dutton has confirmed he would hold a second referendum solely to enshrine Indigenous recognition into the constitution if the voice fails to pass.

The Newspoll showed the Voice Yes campaign was behind 38 points to 53. Above, advocates Anthony Albanese and Indigenous Affairs minister Linda Burney

The Newspoll showed the Voice Yes campaign was behind 38 points to 53. Above, advocates Anthony Albanese and Indigenous Affairs minister Linda Burney

Defending the coalition’s failure to push for constitutional recognition in almost 10 years of government, Mr Dutton said Australia wasn’t previously ready for the issue.

‘We’re going to spend about $450 million to pose a question on October 14 that he (Anthony Albanese) knows is going to fail,’ he told Nine’s Today.

‘I just don’t think he’s going to shift votes unless he gives the detail.’

Nationals leader David Littleproud said the majority of the nation would support constitutional recognition because ‘our country has grown over those nine years’.

He wants the government to split the question or pull the referendum, saying consultative bodies have failed rural and regional Australia in the past.

‘We live with the scars of that every day. That’s where it failed and that’s where the gap hasn’t been closed,’ Mr Littleproud told reporters in Canberra.

‘The Voice is a step too far because it’s just about more bureaucracy rather than a better one.’

The polling also shows support for the ­coalition has reached its highest level since the federal election last year, with the opposition now leading 37 per cent to Labor’s 35 per cent on primary votes.

Labor leads in two-party terms – 53 per cent to 47 per cent.

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